There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute…

Today’s blog will be a little different, but touches on human credulity, especially in the modern world of mass distribution of (mis)information. As a person trained in science, it pains me to see the amount of crap being pumped through social media, and the remarkable Read More …

Neuroscience vs. psychology: Why we need to understand the hardware and software…

Last time, I wrote about the sometimes bridge between psychological research and practise. I pointed out that many psychologists practise based on nonscientific beliefs, instead of sound, evidence-based protocols. Again, last week, I pointed out that many psychologists practise in almost complete ignorance of neuroscience. Few Read More …

Psychologists vs. psychology: It’s time we started practising science…

This week, I’m going to rant. Actually I’m going to rant about my own profession. As you probably know, I’m a psychologist. I first became involved with psychology as a student 25 years ago. Since then, I’ve spent 11 years at university studying it, and Read More …

Evidence versus hearsay: Learning to think like a scientist…

Welcome to Eclectic Moose’s 50th blog – yup, been doing this for almost a whole year. Hope you’re still enjoying. Please let me know if there are any topics you’d like me to write about or incorporate into future blogs. So, onwards. Today I thought Read More …

The science and practise of compassion: Why we don’t need to invoke spirituality to understand and benefit from compassionate action…

Last week I wrote about how to incorporate the basics of mindfulness into your life. I also promised a follow-up on compassion, but rather than to another ‘Dummies guide’, I thought I’d take a stab at both the science behind compassion and some of the things we Read More …

Let’s face it, we’re all DOOMED…

Here’s the deal – given enough time, a biosphere that isn’t collapsing, and fewer rogue states and fanatical morons, we’d probably be OK as a species. Chances are, without the imminent threat of destruction, global warming, famine, water shortages, rising sea levels and toxic oceans, and given Read More …

The dark side of psychology: Manipulation, mind control, and priming…

In my posts so far, I’ve spent the majority of my time talking about the ways in which psychology can benefit us. Mostly, I’ve focused on mindfulness, and understanding the psychoevolutionary basis for human behaviour so that we can choose our actions. As a part of Read More …

Psychology in the future: The science fiction of therapy…

As you probably know, I’m a psychologist. I’ve spent a lot of time studying psychology (including 11 years of tertiary training), and I keep up to date on as much of the leading-edge in my area as I can, as well as in other related areas, Read More …

Bugger, my mind’s been hacked…

I’m going to take a pause between my articles on arrogance (here and here – part 3 coming next time) this week, because I had an experience last week that got me thinking and that I’d really like to share. So, if you know me Read More …

Genius authors, other people’s great ideas and a few thoughts

This week I thought I’d do something a little different. Since I quit my job I’ve had a bit more time on my hands, and I’ve been able to catch up on a little reading. I wanted to share some of the amazing ideas that Read More …

Spanking the Inner Monkey – Part 1

Understanding the limbic system versus the neocortex and why most of us live our lives as smart monkeys rather than human beings Up to now I’ve presented lots of ideas about why this and that, but mostly from a wider societal viewpoint, with lots of Read More …

Consumerism, entitlement and the loss of personal and national identity – Part 2

In my last post I talked about some of the reasons why gadgets are so appealing from a neurological perspective. I also suggested that modern living (and the gadgets) are, in part, responsible for a lack of connectedness with the people around us. Interestingly, a part of Read More …